Category Archives: Nepotism Thursdays

Nepotism Thursday

Good lord, Nepotism Thursday falls on a Thursday this month.  Alert the coast guard!!

Years ago, Ty was approached by Brandon Kruse for an interesting project he was involved with.  Kruse had drawn some issues of Batman and Robin Adventures which Ty had written (issues 9, 12-16, 18-20, 22 and 23) so he was part of Ty’s work “family”.  The project involved doing covers and a couple of interior pages for a superhero character which would be used on a website for that character.

Ty, at the time, was up to his neck teaching at Max the Mutt Animation School, and thought of offering up some of his students to do the work.  For someone who will happily take the opportunity to write, draw, ink, colour and letter his own stuff, Ty actually loves to collaborate–and to pass work on to those he considers deserving. But Kruse was hoping to work more with Ty.

At the time, Ty was teaching our eldest how to ink, so he sent along some samples by Kellam (Templeton-Smith at the time, now using Templeton as his work name), and some colouring and lettering by me (and yes, I can spell when I letter–it’s just that we Canadians like to stick “u”s in our words for something to do–a favourite of ours which I know our neighbours to the south don’t even when they’re out and about.) The samples passed muster and the pages arrived…

All the pages were pencilled by Brandon Kruse. Ty and Kellam divided the inking evenly.  I coloured all but one of the pages (the cover for the trapped Crimson Arrow, as seen immediately above) and lettered ’em all. Ty came up with the aging techniques.

The project went by fairly quickly–but was revisited several times.  I had to make a few changes to the pages a couple of times; once because when the costume was created for the live-action video, a yellow stripe was added to the glove which hadn’t been in the original design.  And other changes came about because…well let’s just say that there used to be extra material on the top of the head of the character and leave it at that.  Basically–thank god for PhotoShop!

You can see how the finished work was used over at

The Crimson Arrow


(I didn’t do the lettering which is used on the opening home page for click-throughs.  That was in place of the dialogue lettering I had done.)

(And, for those of you who might be wondering and speculating…let’s just say that this project came well after Ty signed on as one of the three curators* of The Hoverboy Museum. )

Keiren

*Ty and Rick Green both signed on to help original curator Marcus Moore who had been struggling valiantly for years to build the museum up.

TY HERE: Ten special bonus points for whomever can tell which two covers my son inked, and which two covers I inked.  ALSO:  I coloured one of ’em, and my wife coloured the other three…for THIRTY points, which cover was my colour work.  The clock is ticking, people.  And, as always, the points are redeemable as airmiles.  All winners will receive miles and miles of air, theirs to breathe for  years to come.   By the way, the things atop the Crimson Arrow’s head were, in fact, clearly actionable pointy bat-ears.  I’m not sure why the producers thought the bat-ears were originally acceptable, and I’ll look for one of the un-altered covers to put up in a bit…it was like a neon sign blinking “SUE US!  SUE US!  SUE US!”.   But the whole things was wonderful fun, and my son’s first professional inking paycheck.  So WOO HOO Nepotism Thursdays!

Ty the Guy

Nepotism Thursday! Apples, Trees and Original Sin!

It’s my son’s 14th Birthday today, so naturally it’s time for another “NEPOTISM THURSDAY!” (which falls on a Wednesday this month,  quite common, I assure you).  But because the kid’s going to get lots of expensive gadgets and free food later, I’m going to talk instead about the cartooning work of my father, Charles “Chuck” Templeton, and how far apples fall from trees.  So THERE, beloved son!

Just a quick tease this time out, with a couple of Dad’s sports pieces, scanned from the original art that hangs on my wall and from clippings…Chuck had a  regular cartoon gig for the  Toronto Globe and Mail in the 30s (*actually, when Charles was 17.  By 21, he started his career as an evangelist.  kts),  for about four or five years in what was Dad’s early twenties.  He drew mostly sports,  and some political cartoons with both a remarkable skill for likeness, and a playful skill for comedy.

I had no real sense of my father’s illustrating and cartooning work until after he died.  And though he taught me one or two things about proportion and how to hold a pencil when I was very young, it was nothing like professional secrets or anything.  And since his work was all printed and packed away decades before I was born, I saw almost none of it, until it was entrusted to me when he passed away.

So, what that amazed me most about his work once I got to see a lot of a it at once, is that I see many similar things to my own style in there.  Similar compositional methods, similar lettering even, and the basic skills are in the same zone, though in different styles for different generations.

Considering how little he taught me about the biz, and how little of his work I saw growing up, how freaking odd that there are so many similarities.  My parents were divorced, and I was raised by my mother, so it’s not a question of nurture…  Is there a GENETIC component to an artist’s aesthetic?

YEESH?!?

More of my father’s work to come in future weeks.  I’ve got stacks of it, and much of it is very good.  PLUS, it’s a nice slice of history for the Canadian Comics Corner buffs out there…including Mr. Pincombe.  As for me, I’m off to teach my comic book bootcamp course tonight, and maybe buy my teenaged son a slice of cake, and sing.

NEXT:  How I turned down sitting on an upcoming panel with Stan Lee and Harvey Pekar next week, (I’m an idiot), and the stirrings of JOHNNY CANUCK!  Oh, so exciting!

Ty the Guy!

Nepotism Thursday

A quick little read from Ty’s brother, Brad Templeton, as to whether their father, Charles Templeton, had any top-secret involvement in the creation of the current Canadian flag.

Michael Templeton, Charles Templeton, Ty Templeton, Brad Templeton (not present: sister Deborah Burgess)

Keiren

Personally…I think the story is nonsense.  My father wouldn’t have helped design our national flag, and then kept it a secret.  It’s absolutely not in his nature to not brag.  Fun to think about, though.

Of course, Dad still killed Elvis.  That a family legend I won’t see denied.

Ty the Guy

Nepotism Thursdays!

There’s a great moment, in an old Will Smith film called Six Degrees of Separation, where an art teacher is showing off the water colour paintings of a classroom full of eight year olds.  Somehow, these paintings are magnificent.  Every one of them a bold and wonderful landscape, or haunting portrait or daring abstract, each with brilliant composition and personality.

All of them.

These are the canvases that generations of expressionists have longed to be able to create, all dashed off by eight year olds with casual ease.

“How on earth did you teach your students to paint so beautifully?” the art instructor is asked.

“I taught them nothing,” she answers,  “I just hand them the brushes and watch them paint.  My trick is knowing when to take the paintings away and knowing how to crop ‘em.”

The untrained mind creates some of the most interesting art.  The example above is by my untrained ten year old Sean.  It’s a portrait of his eight year old sister.  And here’s what I like about it  beyond the proud papa, lookie at what muh BOY did aspects…!   I like that he liberally mixes pencil crayon colours in the hair and face, including some BLUE(!) in the facial features.  I never put blue in a flesh tone until college, and even then against my will.  But there it is.  And the blacks in the blonde hair to tone down the way-too-yellow pencil crayon that was supposed to be blonde.  Lovely.

I like the eyes being white, with blue pupils, around gray dots.  That’s my favorite part of the portrait, simply because my mind would never go to that interpretation of reality.  There’s a bit of Modigliani in there, perhaps. The family has large, framed reproductions of his work up in our house, and he’s one of my favorite painters.  To the left is one of the two that hang in his parent’s bedroom, and the elongated face so common to Modigliani’s work is visible in it.

Another painter we have numerous examples of, up around the house, is the deco master (or mistress) Tamara de Lempicka.  Her work also features a glassy eye and an elongated face.  Since I ain’t a zillionaire, we have framed copies of her work darting about our walls, another influence into the ten year old brain, mayhap…?

And finally, I like that Sean has a habit of cutting his artwork out of the paper it’s drawn on after he’s done.  There’s always an element of treating the drawing itself as an object with him…once the art is cut out, it’s then glued to something else, or folded into something, or often just given away in its cut out form.

The trick is knowing when to take it away.

So…take it away Sean Templeton-Smith, this was your first gallery show, and in the company of two modern masters, to boot!

I have four kids in total, each with their own stunning set of talents, so be forewarned, this feature will likely show up again.

Ty the Guy.  Once again, tricking the family into doing his job for him.