Tag Archives: Jack Davis

Where No Bunny Has Gone Before! YAY

spock bun toon logo

Live Long and Hop Around More.

Last week, mere moments after I posted the Bun Toon, I headed out to my local theatre and took in the latest Trek Movie.  This week (with very very slight spoilers), I report back with…

STAR TREK Beyond four panels

Beyond turns out to be my favourite of the last three NuTrek movies.  Maybe because it wasn’t so ambitious, and maybe because they got Spock and McCoy bang-on-bullseye for all their scenes, but it “felt” right, and I was grinning the whole time.   I’ve warmed to the Earth-2 crew, even the new Kirk, though he’s the only one that still doesn’t “feel right” to me.  The rest of it was delightful.

It’s nice to see Trek back on track for the Fiftieth Anniversary coming up in less than a month.  With a new TV series, and other little things here and there, there’s much to celebrate for this old Trekkie, including a return to doing NEW Trek related projects that I can’t talk about in public quite yet…but I promise, I shall shout and howl and promote like crazy when I’m allowed to.  (I probably wasn’t even allowed to say as much as I just did.)

So forget I said anything.

I can’t wait for the next Trek Movie, already announced…with the GHOST OF KIRK’S FATHER!  BOO!

Ty the Guy OUT!

A few days ago, another one of my heroes passed away at the age of 91:  Long time Mad Magazine legend, Jack Davis.


I first encountered Jack, like most of us did, in a Mad Magazine when I was about nine or ten.  He was one of the “gang of idiots”, the cartoonists’ cartoonist, whose casual excellence, and confident line work has been a primary inspiration in my career.

mad jack davis

In my twenties, I consciously tried to draw like Wally Wood, Neal Adams and Jack Kirby, but some years ago, I realised that SUB-consciously, I always draw like Jack Davis.

At least I do when I’m at my best.

His aesthetic, his line, his easy precision, and his lack of pretension, worked together to create what I consider the perfect “cartoon” style of the 20th Century.  It was accessible, and impossibly skilled at the same time.  There was something about the way he seemed to splash colours or tone on his drawings as though he had only minutes until a deadline, and yet EVERYTHING looked like it was in the right place.  The effect was magnificent, and obviously in high demand as Jack did a heck of a lot more than Mad Magazine.


When I finally got good with a crow-quill, I went to Jack Davis art for instruction on how to create all those fabulous textures and tones. It’s a master class on how to make crosshatching and greys work in illustration.

Around the age of nine or ten, I noticed the same guy who was killing it in Mad Magazine, was the guy that did those fantastic TV Guide covers, and those wonderful movie posters, and those album jackets and those back cover adverts.  Jack Davis was everywhere a cartoonist was called for, and no one ever did it better.

Here’s a gallery of some of those MANY TV Guide covers, not as often seen as his Mad Magazine or Time Magazine covers.

andy griffiths jack davis

all in the family jack davis

laugh in jack davis

laverne and shirley jack davis

bob hope jack davis

snl jack daviswkrp jack davis

Last week, the Bun Toon FEATURED artwork inspired by and swiped from Jack Davis.  I was still using him as inspiration as recently as seven days ago.

That’s never going to stop.

tales of crap logo

For last week’s Jack Davis based Bun Toon, click here.

spock bun toon logo

For the Bun Toon archives of years gone by, click here.



Unconventional Bun Toons! YAY!

00 gray window bunny

I didn’t go to any conventions this week, unlike the rest of the population.


While everyone is in San Diego comiconning, I’ve been hanging out at home, going to see Star Trek Beyond (quite good!  yay!) and going through some of my beat-up old Fifties comics…where I came across a cover that seemed far more relevant today than it was when it was first produced in 1958.

tales full of crap websize REV


Of course, it can’t be Donald Trump, he would have been only twelve when this cover was produced, but the portrait bears a striking resemblance to the future Republican nominee.  Perhaps this is a case of life imitating art, and young Donald saw this cover, inspiring him towards a life of public service.

Ty the Guy OUT!

trump comics

The Jack Davis cover looks more like Trump that THIS one does…


San Diego Memories, from a cartoonist not currently there…

san diego memories



all lives matter link

For last week’s Bun Toon, click the image above.

00 gray window bunny

For the ancient Bun Toon archives, click here.



Because The Internet Is Asking For Someone To Do This Bun Toons! YAY

And no one is going to do it, but me.

And no one is going to do it, but me.


You remember, years ago, when America was the home of the brave and the land of the free?


Ty the Guy OUT!

The comics industry saw three major creators retire this week, and it’s worth noting their passing.

Legendary creator Jack Davis is retiring his pencil this week.  At ninety years old, he says it's time to go fishing.

Legendary artist Jack Davis is officially putting down his pencil. At ninety years old, he says it’s time to go fishing.  Considering his astounding body of work, and the personal inspiration he’s always been to me, he’s already caught the big one.

Creator of Tek Jansen and Alpha Force Seven. Stephen Colbert, is also retiring this week.  Though Tek Jansen wasn't a top selling series, there was a lot to recommend it, and I doubt that Mr. Colbert will stay retired long.

Creator of Tek Jansen and Alpha Squad Seven. Stephen Colbert, is also retiring this week. Though Tek Jansen wasn’t a top selling series for ONI Press, there was a lot to recommend it, and I doubt that Mr. Colbert will stay retired long.

Craig Ferguson, the actor who played Aquaman on CBS's Late Night TV show has left CBS for wetter pastures somewhere.  We wish him luck, and have our fingers crossed that he gets the nod should there ever be a big budget Aquaman movie.

Craig Ferguson, the actor who played Aquaman on CBS’s Late Late Show (shown above with Tim Gunn) has left the series for wetter pastures elsewhere. We wish him luck, and have our fingers crossed that he gets the nod should there ever be a big budget Aquaman movie.

For last week's sweet and charming look at Christmas, click here.

For last week’s sweet and charming look at Christmas, click here.

For the Bun Toons archive, click here.

For the Bun Toons archive, click here.

My inner Mad

021 jay leno

00 spockWhen I put up those Harvey Pekar sketches last week, I mentioned that neither of the drawings were in my “usual” style of doing a likeness.  At this point in my career, I’m not sure I have a style, but I do have some vague idea of what sort of final drawing will look right to my eyes, and these ideas are usually rooted in Mort Drucker and John Severin…two of the great Mad artists of my youth.

As you can see by the drawing of a young Jay Leno (done for a Canadian TV Guide some years ago) and the Movie Spock (done for my own amusement last year), my line work tends towards Drucker’s when I’m just trying to make a portrait.

00 woody

Oddly enough, when I fit a likeness into a story (as I did with these panels from various editions of the Factoid BIG BOOK series, or as I’m currently doing with my fun Dexter gig), I find my line work and sensibility tends towards John Severin.   Probably because Severin was slavishly realistic, and Drucker was more playful.

00 orsonEither way, when you add the Jack Davis influence in the Pekar drawing below (coupled with a blatant attempt to inject a little R. Crumb in there, another Harvey Kurtzman protege), I’ve obviously never gotten over my early crush on Mad Magazine.

And I ain’t never gonna.

Ty the Guy

00 frank and mia

Happy 70th Birthday, Harvey Pekar.

Here’s a couple of drawings I did this week to celebrate Harvey Pekar’s 70th Birthday.

Harvey 1

(Click to see the many lovely contributions from a host of other artists at the Harvey Pekar Project Online at smithmag.net)

The realistic portrait I did first– sort of in the the style of Gene Day.  My wife had recently coloured a portrait of Gene for her work, and it had caused a mild nostalgia in me, enough to pull out a bunch of Gene’s Batmans and Masters of Kung Fu… With all those comics in my brain Gene’s style crept into my hands as I was sketching this portrait of Harvey, which it’s never done before, but I’m clearly more of a Zelig than I wish to be.  AK!  GHOST OF GENE DAY!!

Harvey 2

In the long run, I didn’t like the Gene Day-ish drawing because it’s basically just a portrait of Harvey, sketched from a photo, and really, didn’t bring anything to his unique and iconic character– beyond my skills to capture a likeness, and an odd departure for the way I usually draw (which, when I do portraits,  is far more like Mort Drucker –I’ll show you guys later…).

So after an hour or so of carefully capturing Mr. Pekar’s likeness, and inking and washing it in a casual style (to disguise all the labour and erasing in doing the basic portrait), I tossed the whole thing out, and did a cartoon of Harvey out of my head in about three minutes that feels like HARVEY PEKAR to me, even if it doesn’t look as exactly like him.  The madness, the beauty and the Harvey-ness of the character is more “correct” IMHO, when rendered in an expressionist and unconscious way.  Somehow, making it look too much like Harvey the human being, is almost a disservice to Harvey, the beloved comic character.

And I know he’d disagree with me, which is why I LOVE the man.

Happy Birthday Harvey.  You are a treasure to our medium, and it’s always a joy to share a page or a conversation with you.

Harvey 1

Harvey 2

Now, is it just me, or does the second one look like “Middle-Aged Man Logan?”.

Ty the Guy.